Forensic Psychological Evaluation for VAWA

Spousal Abuse Psychological Evaluations are performed on the spouse of a United States citizen or legal resident who has endured domestic violence. The battered spouse often experiences emotional and sexual abuse.  Psychological evaluations supplement the 601 waiver application by documenting the nature, severity, and frequency of the abuse.  The psychological evaluations also document the consequences of the abuse, which may include Depression and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) includes the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).  VAWA and INA tell us that a battered spouse, a battered child, or a battered parent can get an immigrant visa if they are able to show the abuse, batter committed by the united states citizen or united states legal permanent resident (LPR).  The violence against women act (VAWA) as included in the immigration and nationality act (INA) allows the qualifying relatives (battered spouse, a battered child, or a battered parent) to apply for an immigrant visa without the abuser’s knowledge.

battered spouse, a battered child, or a battered parent applies to both men and women, which speaks to our increased awareness into issues of spousal abuse, domestic violence, battered spouse, intimate partner violence.

The violence against women act (VAWA) as included in the immigration and nationality act (INA) gives us an exact description of who can apply for this immigrant visa.  The person applying for immigrant visa under VAWA could have experienced spousal abuse, domestic violence, battered spouse, intimate partner violence inflicted by U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

The person applying for protection under VAWA as described under INA can also be parent whose child was abused by a citizen of the US or a legal permanent resident of the US who suffered abuse, batter, by the American citizen or legal permanent resident of the us.  The applicant for protection under VAWA can also include the children who are not married and are under the age of 21.

The violence against women act (VAWA) and described in INA allows an applicant to be the parent of  American (US) citizen or a legal permanent resident (LPR) who was abusive by committing battered, assault, etc.

The violence against women act (VAWA) and described in INA allows an applicant to be the son or daughter of an American citizen or legal permanent resident who has endured abuse, battered, assault, inflicted by his parent, mother, father.  The child seeking relief under VAWA must be under the age of 21 and must be unmarried.  The children of the child who was abused can also be part of the application under VAWA.  In other words, VAWA under INA allows the grandchildren of the abuser to be included in the application.

The battered spouse must understand what qualifies him for immigration visa under VAWA as described in INA and the forensic psychologist doing the psychological evaluation for immigration must also understand what qualifies the applicant for protection or immigration visa under violence against women act (VAWA).  the applicant for immigrant visa under VAWA must tell the forensic psychologist whether she or he was married a US citizen or legal permanent resident (LPR) who abused them, battered, assaulted, etc.

The applicant for protection under the violence against women act VAWA must document with the help of the forensic psychologist and other documents other than the psychological evaluation whether the marriage was terminated due to abuse within two years of filing for immigrant visa under VAWA.

The applicant (alien) who files for immigration visa under VAWA can also be a person whose spouse lost legal permanent residence due to some criminal offense related to spousal abuse, battered spouse, domestic violence, intimate partner violence, etc.

Sometimes the applicant under VAWA can be eligible for immigrant visa when they were not married to an American citizen or legal permanent resident (LPN). This happens when the applicant (alien) believed the marriage was legitimate but the American citizen or resident was actually committing bigamy in addition the alien applying under VAWA was battered, abused, assaulted during the false marriage.

The applicant is an alien whose spouse is an American citizen or legal permanent resident who inflicted battery, extreme cruelty, assault, sexual abuse, and other forms of domestic violence and now under VAWA the applicant alien can seek some relief.